College for homeschooled dyslexics

Many parents who have children with dyslexia choose to homeschool. It was ideal for us (Scott and Alex). Rather than take classes in lockstep fashion according to our weakest subject, we were able to outpace our peers in areas such as science and math while working to overcome our difficulties with spelling and writing. Unsurprisingly, working on projects like scientific research papers allowed us to better understand the many ways we could overcome the symptoms of dyslexia. By our junior year of high school, we were both able to score in the top 2% on the ACT and SAT without accommodations, and we were both able to secure full ride scholarship offers from multiple engineering colleges. Neither of us found the college application process difficult, perhaps because we were very active in objectively measured projects that allowed us to receive awards and recommendation letters: several community service organizations; competing 10 years at the state level in 4-H; competing in worldwide computer programming competitions; belonging to groups such as scouts and sports teams; active in the visual and performing arts; worked as NASA interns in high school; and we took the AP tests and dual credit courses at local colleges so that we had objective transcripts and letters of recommendation from college professors and our bosses at NASA. Not everyone can do all of that, of course, due to lack of access, time constraints, and other factors. However, if you can do only one thing, this is what we would recommend: take dual credit courses on college campuses. Many colleges are skeptical about dual credit courses taught by high schools, but homeschoolers have the unique ability to attend classes on college campuses during the day. The grades you earn in those classes carry a lot of weight, they prove you can handle rigorous college-level courses, they allow you to get recommendation letters from professors and counselors, and they allow you to complete some “gen ed” requirements before you enroll full time.
Advertisements

New speech recognition for kids

“SoapBox Labs is creating more accurate and accessible speech technology for children that supports reading and language development. It is based on the premise that speech recognition is built for adults, and it doesn’t work as well as it could for kids. That’s because children have higher pitched voices and different speech patterns. Crucially, unlike adults, younger children don’t tend to adapt their speech to suit machines, either.” https://techcrunch.com/2018/01/13/soapbox-labs/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

GGJ18

Proud to report that my brother Scott (co-founder of Dyslexic Kids) was one of the few software engineers who managed to conceptualize, fully program, and implement a complete, original video game at the 48-hour Global Game Jam computer programming competition over the weekend! Dyslexic power! ~Alex

We’re back!

And we’re back! Scott has returned from his study abroad in Argentina and he’s competing in a global programming competition this weekend. Alexandra is taking a full load of engineering classes on a college campus plus finishing her senior year in high school. We’re frightfully busy, but we’ll post as time allows!

Happy Holidays!

Happy holidays, everyone! Thank you for supporting Dyslexic Kids throughout 2017! Help us make 2018 even better – give your unwavering support to a young person who has dyslexia, learn all that you can about dyslexia, and spread awareness about dyslexia in your community. We’ll be back in January!Screen Shot 2017-12-04 at 7.30.00 AM