Dyslexia Diagnosis and the Five Stages of Grief

Who can relate to this? My parents were nodding their heads quite a bit while reading this article!
 
“Dealing with my son’s diagnosis of dyslexia was like going through the five stages of grief. It took four years of sleepless nights and buckets of tears for both of us. There were so many days when I thought I’d never stop feeling broken-hearted for him, worrying that he would never learn to read or fail out of school by grade five and that it was all my fault…
 
Then came stage two—that’s when my temples began to pulse. My patience evaporated and I wanted to punch everyone in the throat…
 
Fed up and desperate, I began to negotiate in my head. Enter stage three: bargaining. I went on all the field trips, volunteered and fundraised for the school. If I did more for the school and eased the teacher’s stress, surely they would help him read…
 
Cut to stage four: depression. I cried for two weeks. I was crushed and felt like I was carrying around 150 pounds of darkness. I had failed my son. Suddenly, it felt like everyone else’s kids were reading…
 
Crying didn’t seem to help him learn to read any faster. There was nothing left to do but come to terms with the reality and finally enter stage five: acceptance. Armed with a diagnosis of dyslexia, I went back to his teachers with newfound hope. Sadly, I discovered that they weren’t able to teach kids with dyslexia, refused to admit it as a reality and carefully made sure that they weren’t violating his human rights to access educational resources…
 
I’m hoping that the final stage of having a child with dyslexia is love. I love having a child with dyslexia. Now that I’ve done my research and spent time with an entire school full of kids who have dyslexia, I understand how amazing these kids really are…”
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Happy Read Across America Day!

Happy Read Across America Day! Parents and teachers – please take the time to read a book with a young person today!

Looking for some fun activities to celebrate? Pinterest is loaded with great ideas, as is the official Read Across America Day website:

http://www.nea.org/grants/886.htm