College for homeschooled dyslexics

Many parents who have children with dyslexia choose to homeschool. It was ideal for us (Scott and Alex). Rather than take classes in lockstep fashion according to our weakest subject, we were able to outpace our peers in areas such as science and math while working to overcome our difficulties with spelling and writing. Unsurprisingly, working on projects like scientific research papers allowed us to better understand the many ways we could overcome the symptoms of dyslexia. By our junior year of high school, we were both able to score in the top 2% on the ACT and SAT without accommodations, and we were both able to secure full ride scholarship offers from multiple engineering colleges. Neither of us found the college application process difficult, perhaps because we were very active in objectively measured projects that allowed us to receive awards and recommendation letters: several community service organizations; competing 10 years at the state level in 4-H; competing in worldwide computer programming competitions; belonging to groups such as scouts and sports teams; active in the visual and performing arts; worked as NASA interns in high school; and we took the AP tests and dual credit courses at local colleges so that we had objective transcripts and letters of recommendation from college professors and our bosses at NASA. Not everyone can do all of that, of course, due to lack of access, time constraints, and other factors. However, if you can do only one thing, this is what we would recommend: take dual credit courses on college campuses. Many colleges are skeptical about dual credit courses taught by high schools, but homeschoolers have the unique ability to attend classes on college campuses during the day. The grades you earn in those classes carry a lot of weight, they prove you can handle rigorous college-level courses, they allow you to get recommendation letters from professors and counselors, and they allow you to complete some “gen ed” requirements before you enroll full time.
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